FAQ’s

/FAQ’s
This section of “FAQ” Frequently Asked Questions, and their Answers is for parents and youngsters on how to stay safe on the internet FAQ, is nothing but “Frequently Asked Questions”, compilation of our answers to a set of questions that are being asked frequently by parents & youngsters.
Safesurf Bahrain is an Online Safety initiative taken up by the Telecommunications Regulatory Authority of the Kingdom of Bahrain (“TRA”), envisaged to help and offer awareness to parents and guardians on almost all the best aspects of the online world. This initiative also facilitates a learning curve highlighting the dangers their children could face online, so that they can use the internet safely and responsibly.
The Telecommunications Regulatory Authority, or TRA, is an independent body in Kingdom of Bahrain, which was established by a Legislative Decree promulgating the Telecommunications Law. TRA is entrusted with the duties and powers that include protecting the interests of subscribers and users, and also to promote effective and fair competition among established and new licensed operators.

www.tra.org.bh.

  1. Wireless Devices: Electronic tools able to transfer information over a distance without the use of electrical wires. Examples include smart phones, BlackBerrys, Iphones, and cell phones with Internet capabilities.
  2. Social Networking: The interaction between a group of people who share interests, activities, backgrounds, or real-life connections. Examples include YouTube and Facebook.
  3. Tweeting: Text-based posts with a limit of 140 characters displayed on the author’s profile page, spread to the author’s subscribers timeline’s and who are known as followers.
  4. Instagramming: Oline photo-sharing and social networking service that enables its users to take pictures, apply digital filters to them, and share them on a variety of social networking services, such as Facebook or Twitter.
  5. Blogging: The act of sharing an online journal where people can post diary entries about their personal experiences, hobbies and opinions.
  6. Interactive Gaming: Games that participants can play against others on the same network (typically the Internet). Certain providers, such as Microsoft Xbox Live, offer other enhanced services such as advertising, chat, product/service sales and support, instant messaging and more.
Generally speaking, the Internet is a pretty safe place. But, at the same time, the Internet could be dangerous, similar to anything we do in real life.
Reporting an e-crime is just like reporting any other offence.

First, you need ask yourself is it an emergency?

  1. Is the offence occurring right now or has it just occurred? AND
  2. Are people in danger physically? OR
  3. Is property in immediate danger of being damaged?
  4. If the answer is YES. call 999

For example, if you have received an electronic message conveying an immediate and believable threat such as “I’m coming to your house now, and I’m going to kill you”, that would be an emergency.

Firstly, it’s important, and hence advised to pay your attention to the safesurf Tutorial which would share the information on the potential dangers that Internet pose to our children. In brief, the Internet is an open source of information that is not necessarily designed for children. Exploring the Internet without adult supervision or guidance can expose a child to sites that are harmful such as: (sites that advocate violence, inappropriate content, sites that encourage inappropriate behavior).
There are many commercial Internet filters available in the market, though some of them are shared here in our website at “Useful Links”. Internet filters that generally work on several levels, search listed web sites that contain inappropriate words.

Internet filters block sites that are of illegitimate interest. Having said that, filters would never replace the careful guidance of concerned parents and teachers.

Please do ensure that your children are allowed to use the Internet under direct adult supervision only. Do pay strict attention to what the children are doing in internet, by randomly checking their behavior, and by watching out for certain telltale signs of guilt such as turning, dimming or obscuring the screen, glancing over shoulders, etc.
Make the Internet a family experience. Monitor your child’s use and discuss Safesurf tutorial and make it part of the experience. If you allow chat or “IM” instant messenger or any interactive messaging facilities, or have a personal social site, be sure that you know whom your child is chatting with, and who are his/her friends.. Insist on moderated chat rooms and do consider keeping your internet computer in a public place in your house (e.g. the living room).

Please give adequate awareness to your child on how to protect their privacy.

Chat rooms and Instant Messenger programs are very popular with children. They love to get online with their friends. But, unfortunately children don’t always necessarily know who they are really chatting with.

If you allow your children to use chat or IM at home, please follow a couple of simple precautions:

  1. Be sure that you know who your child is chatting with.
  2. Only allow your child to enter moderated chat rooms (i.e. rooms that are supervised by a responsible adult).
  3. Monitor your child’s Internet use, make this a family experience.

Always talk to your child about his/her experience online.

When you surf through the Internet, you risk a high chance of downloading any computer virus, or having your vital and personal information (e.g. Private information, credit card information, bank account details etc.) misused and/or sold to companies, having your surfing patterns and demographics tracked through cookies and many more..
There are people on the Internet who can be trusted, but there are also people on the Internet who can’t be trusted at all. In real world, it is very difficult to identify them as who can be trusted and who cannot. It is advisable not to trust anyone you don’t know in person.
A good practical idea would be to create a parent/child contract and post it on the wall next to the computer. You can view a sample contract in the added resources section of the safesurf tutorial.
Chatting online, like other aspects of Internet use, should be governed by common sense. Remind your child that people in chat rooms are strangers and are not always who they say they are. Your child should never give out any personal information, including his or her real name, address, school, or other clues which might allow someone to locate them. Again, the bottom line is that your children will take what you teach them wherever they go.
Even if your child does not visit inappropriate sites, sometimes the inappropriate sites come looking for visitors. They do this by sending out bulk, unsolicited e-mails, called spam. So, before you punish your child, know that the unwanted emails what they have been receiving are probably not a result of your child’s online surfing.
Safety on the Internet isn’t about technology, but it’s just about common sense. Just as you wouldn’t want your child to meet and share private matters with a stranger in the real world, you wouldn’t want them to do so online. So, talking with your children about safety on the Internet just means talking to them about common sense. Please see to it and ensure that your children are not doing anything online that they wouldn’t do in the real world.
Yes, there are dangers on the Internet. If you learn how to protect yourself you will be safe. One of the dangers that you need to look out for, are predators. You can protect your children from predators by monitoring your child’s activity. Another danger is that your child will be able to access inappropriate sites and violent information. You can install filtering software that will help to block out this type of information. No system is fool proof, but it can help to block some of it. There are many more things you can do to be safe, please go through the Safesurf tutorial.
No you are not anonymous while on the Internet. When you log into your provider you are assigned an unique IP Address, which is a number. (IP Address is a unique numerical label assigned to your computer which is being used an Internet Protocol for communication. These numbers forming the IP Address are binary in nature). Whenever you log into a Website, chat room or forum the IP address of your computer or the device being used to avail internet services, can be traced. This is not dangerous in normal scenario because, with millions of visitors to the Internet each day, most Websites wouldn’t have the time to track everyone down.
Letting your child have their own email address is absolutely fine. But, make it clear to them though, though, that you will have to monitor it. Before your child opens his or her mailbox, go through and check the contents. This could be termed as eavesdropping, but there is no such thing as privacy on the Internet.
Many sites require registration to be made, before you can view their information. Before giving out your email address to questionnaires online, you should check their privacy statement. Privacy statements are usually followed by the companies that write them, especially with companies that have registered with Trustee. To be on the safe side, you may want to go register for a free email address with About.com or Hotmail. That way you protect your email account from spam (unsolicited email).
A child has complete control over anything in their own diary but on the internet there are other dangerous forces at work that they do not have control over, such as the insidious behavior of internet predators. Monitoring your children’s internet activities would help in identifying thieves and the ever present danger of exposure to inappropriate material they are not ready for. Drive the point home with your kids, that there is no such thing as complete privacy on the Internet. Any communication can be inspected by anyone along the way.
Yes! If a child doesn’t know what is expected and what isn’t, then you may anticipate him/her getting into trouble. We suggest you to make a parent/child agreement to let them know what the consequences would be if they or you don’t follow them. Please visit the added resources section in the safesurf tutorial to have a copy.
Use a combination of numbers, symbols, and letters and make sure it is at least 6 characters long. Change your password frequently and NEVER give it out, to anyone. Try not to keep it written down. Generally, avoid using the same password for multiple accounts.

This section of “FAQ” Frequently Asked Questions, and their Answers is for parents and youngsters on how to stay safe on the internet

FAQ, is nothing but “Frequently Asked Questions“, compilation of our answers to a set of questions that are being asked frequently by parents & youngsters.

Safesurf Bahrain is an Online Safety initiative taken up by the Telecommunications Regulatory Authority of the Kingdom of Bahrain (“TRA”), envisaged to help and offer awareness to parents and guardians on almost all the best aspects of the online world. This initiative also facilitates a learning curve highlighting the dangers their children could face online , so that they can use the internet safely and responsibly.

The Telecommunications Regulatory Authority, or TRA, is an independent body in Kingdom of Bahrain, which was established by a Legislative Decree promulgating the Telecommunications Law. TRA is entrusted with the duties and powers that include protecting the interests of subscribers and users, and also to promote effective and fair competition among established and new licensed operators.

TRA

  1. Wireless Devices: Electronic tools able to transfer information over a distance without the use of electrical wires. Examples include smart phones, BlackBerry, Iphone, and cell phones with Internet capabilities.
  2. Social Networking: The interaction between a group of people who share interests, activities, backgrounds, or real-life connections. Examples include YouTube and Facebook.
  3. Tweeting: Text-based posts with a limit of 140 characters displayed on the author’s profile page, spread to the author’s subscribers timeline’s and who are known as followers.
  4. Instagramming: Online photo-sharing and social networking service that enables its users to take pictures, apply digital filters to them, and share them on a variety of social networking services, such as Facebook or Twitter.
  5. Blogging: The act of sharing an online journal where people can post diary entries about their personal experiences, hobbies and opinions.
  6. Interactive Gaming: Games that participants can play against others on the same network (typically the Internet). Certain providers, such as Microsoft Xbox Live, offer other enhanced services such as advertising, chat, product/service sales and support, instant messaging and more.

Generally speaking, the Internet is a pretty safe place. But, at the same time, the Internet could be dangerous, similar to anything we do in real life.

Reporting an e-crime is just like reporting any other offense.

First, you need ask yourself is it an emergency?

  • Is the offence occurring right now or has it just occurred? AND
  • Are people in danger physically? OR
  • Is property in immediate danger of being damaged?
  • If the answer is YES. call: 999

For example, if you have received an electronic message conveying an immediate and believable threat such as “I’m coming to your house now, and I’m going to kill you”, that would be an emergency.

Firstly, it’s important, and hence advised to pay your attention to the safesurf Tutorial which would share the information on the potential dangers that Internet pose to our children. In brief, the Internet is an open source of information that is not necessarily designed for children.

Exploring the Internet without adult supervision or guidance can expose a child to sites that are harmful such as: (sites that advocate violence, inappropriate content, sites that encourage inappropriate behavior).

There are many commercial Internet filters available in the market, though some of them are shared here in our website at “Useful Links”. Internet filters that generally work on several levels, search listed web sites that contain inappropriate words.

Internet filters block sites that are of illegitimate interest. Having said that, filters would never replace the careful guidance of concerned parents and teachers.

Please do ensure that your children are allowed to use the Internet under direct adult supervision only. Do pay strict attention to what the children are doing in internet, by randomly checking their behavior, and by watching out for certain telltale signs of guilt such as turning, dimming or obscuring the screen, glancing over shoulders, etc.

Make the Internet a family experience. Monitor your child’s use and discuss Safesurf tutorial and make it part of the experience. If you allow chat or “IM” instant messenger or any interactive messaging facilities, or have a personal social site, be sure that you know whom your child is chatting with, and who are his/her friends. Insist on moderated chat rooms and do consider keeping your internet computer in a public place in your house (e.g. the living room). Please give adequate awareness to your child on how to protect their privacy.

Chat rooms and Instant Messenger programs are very popular with children. They love to get online with their friends. But, unfortunately children don’t always necessarily know who they are really chatting with.

If you allow your children to use chat or IM at home, please follow a couple of simple precautions:

  1. Be sure that you know who your child is chatting with.
  2. Only allow your child to enter moderated chat rooms (i.e. rooms that are supervised by a responsible adult).
  3. Monitor your child’s Internet use, make this a family experience.

Always talk to your child about his/her experience online.

When you surf through the Internet, you risk a high chance of downloading any computer virus, or having your vital and personal information (e.g Private information, credit card information, bank account details etc.) misused and/or sold to companies, having your surfing patterns and demographics tracked through cookies and many more…

There are people on the Internet who can be trusted, but there are also people on the Internet who can’t be trusted at all. In real world, it is very difficult to identify them as who can be trusted and who cannot. It is advisable not to trust anyone you don’t know in person.

A good practical idea would be to create a parent/child contract and post it on the wall next to the computer. You can view a sample contract in the added resources section of the safesurf tutorial.

Chatting online, like other aspects of Internet use, should be governed by common sense. Remind your child that people in chat rooms are strangers and are not always who they say they are. Your child should never give out any personal information, including his or her real name, address, school, or other clues which might allow someone to locate them. Again, the bottom line is that your children will take what you teach them wherever they go.

Even if your child does not visit inappropriate sites, sometimes the inappropriate sites come looking for visitors. They do this by sending out bulk, unsolicited e-mails, called spam. So, before you punish your child, know that the unwanted emails what they have been receiving are probably not a result of your child’s online surfing.

Safety on the Internet isn’t about technology, but it’s just about common sense. Just as you wouldn’t want your child to meet and share private matters with a stranger in the real world, you wouldn’t want them to do so online. So, talking with your children about safety on the Internet just means talking to them about common sense. Please see to it and ensure that your children are not doing anything online that they wouldn’t do in the real world.

Yes, there are dangers on the Internet. If you learn how to protect yourself you will be safe. One of the dangers that you need to look out for, are predators. You can protect your children from predators by monitoring your child’s activity. Another danger is that your child will be able to access inappropriate sites and violent information. You can install filtering software that will help to block out this type of information. No system is fool proof, but it can help to block some of it. There are many more things you can do to be safe, please go through the safesurf tutorial.

No you are not anonymous while on the Internet. When you log into your provider you are assigned an unique IP Address, which is a number. (IP Address is a unique numerical label assigned to your computer which is being used an Internet Protocol for communication. These numbers forming the IP Address are binary in nature). Whenever you log into a Website, chat room or forum the IP address of your computer or the device being used to avail internet services, can be traced. This is not dangerous in normal scenario because, with millions of visitors to the Internet each day, most Websites wouldn’t have the time to track everyone down.

Letting your child have their own email address is absolutely fine. But, make it clear to them though, though, that you will have to monitor it. Before your child opens his or her mailbox, go through and check the contents. This could be termed as eavesdropping, but there is no such thing as privacy on the Internet.

Many sites require registration to be made, before you can view their information. Before giving out your email address to questionnaires online, you should check their privacy statement. Privacy statements are usually followed by the companies that write them, especially with companies that have registered with Trustee. To be on the safe side, you may want to go register for a free email address with About.com or Hotmail. That way you protect your email account from spam (unsolicited email).

A child has complete control over anything in their own diary but on the internet there are other dangerous forces at work that they do not have control over, such as the insidious behavior of internet predators. Monitoring your children’s internet activities would help in identifying thieves and the ever present danger of exposure to inappropriate material they are not ready for. Drive the point home with your kids, that there is no such thing as complete privacy on the Internet. Any communication can be incepted by anyone along the way.

Yes! If a child doesn’t know what is expected and what isn’t, then you may anticipate him/her getting into trouble. We suggest you to make a parent/child agreement to let them know what the consequences would be if they or you don’t follow them. Please visit the added resources section in the safesurf tutorial to have a copy.

Use a combination of numbers, symbols, and letters and make sure it is at least 6 characters long. Change your password frequently and NEVER give it out, to anyone. Try not to keep it written down. Generally, avoid using the same password for multiple accounts.